Outside the Stafford Air and Space Museum, giving visitors a hint of what’s inside the museum, are three outdoor exhibits: the F-4 Phantom, the T-33, and the Apollo Boilerplate. The Boilerplate, being the only spacecraft outside the museum, is about to become an outdoor exhibit like no other. The spacecraft, which is a real craft built for test projects, during the Apollo days, arrived at the museum years ago. The boilerplate (named for the type of steel used in its construction) were an inexpensive way to conduct a variety of tests and evaluations of the actual Apollo spacecraft. The museum’s boilerplate (BP-1210) has the same dimensions, shape, weight and center of gravity of a real Apollo, and was used in water recovery training. As the boilerplates proved out the many complex designs and procedures necessary for an Apollo mission to the moon, it was then set aside for the real Apollo to take center stage with astronauts aboard. The surviving boilerplates are now spread throughout the country, and have become landmarks for a variety of museums, centers, and schools, as will the museum’s unit. The Boilerplate’s newest task is to become the centerpiece of the museum’s newest revitalized exhibit, the ‘Path of Honor.” Bricks with the names of patrons, donors, supporters, and members of the museum will encircle the boilerplate creating a quiet exhibit for reflection and respect to all those who have contributed to the great Space Race and the Stafford Museum. New landscaping, provided by Chambers Landscaping, will provide a colorful addition to the exhibit, enhancing the exterior of the museum. Bricks will be placed around the boilerplate this summer and a new paint job underneath it will also take place this summer provided by museum member Bobby Marsee. If you are interested in having a special person immortalized in the “Path of Honor,” contact Brandi Rizzi at the museum.